The Jelly Jar Flush Mount Light

The Jelly Jar Flush Mount Light

When you are renovating you spend thousands of dollars on structural fixes and then furnishings. But when it comes to the lighting budget you might not have much left. I offer a simple solution that won’t break the bank. The simple jelly jar flush mount. It is aesthetically pleasing and solves the problem of lighting hallways, pantries, bathrooms, closets and porches. A simple glass jar illuminated with a clear light bulb is quite elegant.

You can find Jelly Jar lights at most big box stores. They are under $20 and come in oil rubbed bronze, white or antique brass steel bases. Flush mounts are perfect for halls or closets where a sconce would be super sweet in a bathroom with a a vintage vibe.

I bought a set for my hallway in the oil rubbed bronze. Once I installed them I liked them but I didn’t love them. I kept thinking about Thomas O’Brien’s Perry Flush Mount and this updated jelly jar light by Deborah Ehrlich . I was worried I was being cheap in buying in the basic jelly jar and I should have just sucked up the extra cost and chose a different designed light.

I decided to try giving the base an antique brass treatment using Rub n’ Buff wax metallic finish paint. I only used a tiny bit and squirted on onto a piece of cardboard. I used a soft cotton rag to rub onto the lamp base. I added just a tiny bit of paint and rubbed back and forth all over the base. I wanted the black tone to show through so I was careful not to over apply the paint. I think it gives it more of an aged brass look rather then flat brass. I then covered the screws with paint to match too.

The installation is pretty simple but if you are new to installing lighting please contact an electrician. The glass jar screws into the bottom of the base with three screws.

I am super happy with how they turned out and can’t be more satisfied with the results. Step-by-step photos below.





No-Sew DIY Headboard

No-Sew DIY Headboard

An Old Block Curtain and Fabric Sash Headboard

I have wanted to make a slipcover for my headboard for years. I am not the most skillful seamstress and I was trying to figure out how to make a box to slip over my headboard. But then it occurred to me, Why am I fussing about this so much? I can just wrap the fabric around my headboard like a flat sheet.

This is how you do it. Make sure your fabric is largest enough to cover your headboard with a little extra to wrap around. Lay the fabric against your headboard, centering it so you have equal amounts on each side. Then start at the top corners and fold like you would do a hospital corner on a sheet. Tuck behind the headboard. My headboard is pretty close to the wall so the fabric stays behind. But you could also use a few pins to secure. I then drape and tuck down the sides. The piece that hangs down onto my mattress I tucked between the mattress and headboard.

This technique is so easy. Now when you wash your sheets for the week you can swap out your headboard fabric too. You might also need to be a fabric hoarder like me but you can buy pretty tapestries, tablecloths, quilts or even fabric yardage if you don’t own anything. Be creative and layer, layer, layer. I will be updating this post with new ideas every week.

Read: 3 Ways to Reuse Your Hippy Tapestry From College

My Hippy Tapestry Headboard
My Quilt Wrapped Headboard
My Old Curtain and Fabric Found at a Tag Sale Headboard



Why It’s Completely O.K. To Have Painted Plywood Floors In A Bedroom

Why It’s Completely O.K. To Have Painted Plywood Floors In A Bedroom
When we bought our house one of the first things we did is rip out the old gray wall to wall carpeting on our third floor. It was old and smelled of cat pee. Underneath was plywood floors (sub floor) painted brown in one room and blue the other.
I covered the floors with sisal rugs and left it that way for years. We always had plans to do a complete gut job of the space and knew the floor would probably get covered with new wood flooring or carpet.
In the meantime life happened. The older you get the more expensive life gets. I decided to stop waiting and just spruce the floors up with some paint.
In this photo I am reinstalling the beds and touching up any places I missed.

What I learned in the process is that plywood floors are perfectly O.K. They are wood and once you paint them and put down a rug you will literally not notice it’s plywood.
I painted the kids room floor in Benjamin Moore’s Floor and Patio paint. The color is a color match to Farrow & Ball’s Babouche. The difference in price is about $54 a galloon vs. $137 for the Farrow & Ball. I know the Farrow & Ball color is probably a bit more outstanding and multi dimensional but I was unsure about the color and couldn’t commit. In hindsight I wish I would have just gone for the Farrow & Ball but this looks great too.

I prepped the floor by doing two coats of primer. I did not sand. After the primer had dried overnight I rolled on the yellow. Be warned: yellow is a hard paint color. It takes 4-5 thin layers to get the paint to completely cover. I did this using a small roller but also filled in spots with a brush.

Floor Paint by Benjamin Moore

I ran into a little trouble when I pulled up a the rug that was under the kids beds. It had a large worn spot from an office chair. I decided I needed to sand it.

I sanded it just enough to take off the top where the wood was hanging. I did not sand it to a full hand smooth finish. If I would have kept going I think I would have ended up down a road of me sanding the entire floor. The floor is dented and dinged but overall it’s smooth. I then mixed a cup of epoxy and poured over the damaged spot and spread with a roller. I added an added an additional coat about an hour later. I let dry overnight. The epoxy is like glue sticking everything together and down. I can still see divots but none of the wood is pulling up. The next day I primed and painted.


The floors have a beach house vibe and since plywood is laid in large sheets it’s a sea of flat color with very few seams. It looks cohesive. The amount of money I saved from not laying new hardwood and painting would probably be thousands. I feel like this is a compromise I can live with and does not have me thinking I am waiting to gut it. I think unpainted plywood could be really slick too with a poly to seal. I think plywood is totally overlooked and can be seen as low brow. But it has so many brilliant uses that feel modern and smart.



How To Block Print Your Walls

How To Block Print Your Walls

Block printing your walls is a fairly easy technique. The materials you will need are paint, a carved block and a sponge. 

I painted my walls a Benjamin Moore match to in Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster in Regal Select Matte finish. The walls paint are matte which I think is more forgiving to bumpy old walls and the finish looks more like real wallpaper. 

I choose a large block to print on my wall. In my trials the smaller detailed blocks lost their detail. This block is about to 5 inches in length.

I would suggest only printing on walls with wall board. You need some give to get full contact of the block to the wall. When you print on fabric block printers print on a padded surface. When I tested the block on my plaster walls the print barely showed up. Hard surface to hard surface does not work. Molly Mahon suggested for my plaster walls I look at potato stamping.

I used old matte latex paint to print because this project because it started as a trial and I used what I had lying around the house. Sometimes the scrappy method can yield the best results. I assume traditional block printing inks would work too.

Step 1 Paint your walls the base color (mine is similar to Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster)

Step 2 Pour your block color into a shallow painting tray and moisten a kitchen sponge. Wring out any excess water.  ( I used Farrow & Ball’s James White)

Step 3 Dab paint onto block using the moistened sponge. 

Step 4 Press block firmly to the wall. Spend your time experiencing with how hard you need to push. I pushed till I felt the give of the wall board behind the block.

Step 5 Decide on a repeat. I spaced mine by doing two rows at once. The first print starts one column. The second column dropped one full print staggering the image all the way down the column. Repeat across entire wall. 

I found working left to right was the easiest way to set up the pattern. Once you have a few rows printed you will start to see how things should line up. Make sure to line up the print vertically and horizontally. It won’t be a perfect repeat and mistakes are bound to happen but that’s part of the charm. 

Tips for loading paint onto blocks I put more paint then I thought was necessary to get a full print. Sometimes when I printed a pattern the paint looked too thick. But after drying it looked beautiful. If it’s really horrible you can go back with your base color and paint over and try again. But try not to fuss to much. Your eyes will naturally gravitate towards the full design. 

I printed up both sides of my stairwell and hallway. I did the project over a few day period but one wall came together rather quickly.  I am super happy with the results and I think it’s just as beautiful as wallpaper.

Here a few of my picks from the same shop I ordered from off Etsy. I found the blocks to be really nice quality and affordable. Shipping was quick and everything came well packaged.

Hand carved wood textile india block stamp 30, $5, etsy.com
Wood Block Stamp Flower 190, $10, etsy.com
Hand carved wood stamp 296, $15, etsy.com.
Carved Wood Stamp 124, $7, etsy.com.